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Water Conservation

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Below is a plethora of information related to water conservation, efficiency and pollution prevention. For more information please contact Douglas Krauss, Environmental Programs Manager, at dkrauss@hermosabeach.gov
 Water Saving Rules  

Water Conservation Flyer



ENVIRONMENTALLY FRIENDLY

 LANDSCAPING, GARDENING AND PEST

 CONTROL

 

GRASS REPLACEMENT REBATE PROGRAM

West Basin Water District, in conjunction with the Metropolitan Water District, is offering rebates of $3 per square foot for grass removal.

See the flyer linked below or contact West Basin at 888-376-3314 or www.westbasin.org/grass-replacement

Grass Replacement Flyer

 


Banner Grass-Replacement-Program-Rebate

 

 



Be the Solution to Coastal Pollution 
 waves-1
Our beaches and natural waterways are the jewels of our coastal communities, but did you know that outdoor maintenance activities can pollute these treasured places if we aren’t careful? Our storm drain system works by draining water that ends up on our streets, sidewalks, and parking lots as quickly as possible into our local waterways and the ocean. This is great for preventing flooding, but not so great for preventing pollution.  

 

Tips for Patio, Sidewalk and Storefront Cleaning 
You don’t dump trash into the ocean, but when you allow wash water to run into the storm drain system you are polluting the ocean in a different way. Unless you take care, urban runoff from outdoor cleaning activities will flow through this system directly into our local waterways carrying pollutants that harm aquatic life and make the ocean unsafe for swimming. 

You can minimize your impact on the ocean and local waterways when cleaning a patio or sidewalk by following these simple tips!


Stay Dry 
Sweep
Before using water:
  • Sweep or a use another dry method (e.g., shop vacuum, rags or wire brushes) to clean instead of washing with water. If spills, trash, and debris are swept or removed promptly, you will need to clean with water less often.
  • Keep spill kits on hand with absorbent materials such as flour or cat litter to clean up oil or grease spills, then sweep up promptly and dispose in a trash can or dumpster. 
  • Vacuum or sweep any visible pollutants like litter, trash and food waste and dispose in the trash before washing.
  • Never sweep or blow trash, litter or any debris into the street, parking lot, or catch basin.
 
 Easy on the H2O
Rain Drop Drop Top
 If you must use water:
  • Use a wet mop to clean outdoor eating areas—wring the mop out over a bucket and dump the dirty wash water into a mop sink or toilet.
  • Use only potable water (not recycled water) without cleaning agents or detergents. 
  • Direct wash water runoff into landscaped areas where it can soak into the ground (using sand bags or other type of raised barrier to direct the water). 
  • Or collect the runoff in a temporary containment area and use a pump or shop vacuum to dispose of the wash water into the sanitary sewer system. Note: Discharging large amounts of wastewater to the sanitary sewer system may require a special permit—check with the Los Angeles County Sanitation Districts.
  • Never use a hose or regular spray nozzle on paved areas, only use a low volume-high pressure spray washing device—these can be purchased or rented online or through a local home improvement store and should be rated to use no more than 3 gallons of water per minute (GPM). Click here for water conservation information. 
  • If despite the above precautions, some runoff does flow to the storm drain, pay attention to where the runoff will flow, and don’t let it run through dirty or unsanitary areas on its way to the storm drain. Redirect the runoff away from potential pollutants using sand bags or other type of raised barrier.

Tips for Residential and 
Charity Car Washing 
Urban runoff from car washing activities contains dangerous chemicals that can harm aquatic life and make the ocean unsafe for swimming. If care is not taken when washing your car in your driveway or conducting outdoor non-profit car washes, this runoff will drain through the storm drain system directly into our local waterways and the ocean. Alternatively, when you wash your car at a commercial car wash, the water is often recycled or reused and any wastewater is sent to the sanitary sewer system where it is treated. 
You can minimize your impact on the ocean and local waterways when washing cars by following these simple tips!


Location, Location, Location
Purple Car Wash 
When selecting a site:
  • Choose a pervious surface such as a grassy, gravel, or pervious paving area where the rinse water can soak into the ground, or where it will runoff into a landscaped area, not into the street and storm drain. 
  • Better yet, take your car to a commercial car wash that recycles the water.
  • Request a local commercial car wash to sponsor/host your non-profit fundraiser and use their wash water recycling systems and sanitary sewer connection. 
  • Instead of having volunteers wash cars, partner with a local car wash to donate a percentage of their proceeds or allow you to promote a discounted wash day to raise money for your non-profit.
  • Find a commercial business with a pervious paving parking lot to host your non-profit car wash.
 Be Prepared
Knotted Hose
 Prepare the site and gather proper materials:
  • Sweep up litter, and remove oil and grease from the surface using an absorbent material such as flour or cat litter, then dispose in the trash.
  • Minimize water use by using a quick release nozzle.
  • Have sandbags or other type of raised barrier on hand to direct rinse water runoff into landscaped areas where it can soak into the ground.
  • Or collect the runoff in a temporary containment area and use a pump or shop vacuum to dispose of the wash water into the sanitary sewer system. Note: Discharging large amounts of wastewater to the sanitary sewer system may require a special permit—check with the Los Angeles County Sanitation Districts.
  • Choose soaps/detergents labeled as less toxic, phosphate-free—found at most retailers and online.
  • Don’t use engine and wheel cleaners and degreasers.
 Clean and Green 
Man Washing Car
 While washing cars:
  • If some runoff from rinse water is generated, pay attention to where the runoff will flow, and don’t let it run through dirty areas on its way to the storm drain. Redirect the runoff using sand bags or other type of raised barrier.
  • Use a bucket of soapy water instead of applying soap or detergent directly to rag, sponge or car. Squeeze rags or sponges out into the bucket and not onto the ground.
  • Products labeled “biodegradable” can still harm to aquatic life even if it is safe for plants, so empty soapy water buckets into a toilet or sink. 
  • Vacuum or shake mats off over a trash can or landscaped area to avoid dumping dirt and debris directly onto the ground.